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FILLING OUT A RADIOGRAM & HOW TO SEND ONE ON THE NET

GENERAL INFORMATION: Some sections are OPTIONAL, some are MANDATORY please take note. The use of the pre-printed message form from ARRL is not necessary for handling traffic, but a standard format will make sending and receiving traffic more accurate for sender and receiver.

* SPECIAL NOTE, I WOULD RECOMMEND THAT YOU PRINT A RADIOGRAM OUT SO THAT YOU CAN REFER TO A HARD COPY. GET ONE HERE.

Preamble
Number Precedence Hx Station of Origin Check Place of Origin Time Date
               
To: Addressee
This Radio message was received at
Station Date:
Name:
Address:
Phone figures:
City, State, Zip
Del.Date/Time:
YOUR
TEXT
GOES
HERE
X
5
ONLY
ONE
WORD
CAN
BE
10
USED
PER
BOX
X
SEE
15
HOW
EASY
IT
IS
73
20
SEE
YOU
ON
THE
NET
25
Signature:
Amateur Station:
Additional Comments\delivery problems:
From
Date
Time
From
Date
Time
Received: Sent:

Now lets learn how to fill out a radiogram.

(This is called the preamble click on text in each box to see what information goes there)

Preamble
Number Precedence Hx Station of Origin Check Place of Origin Time Date
               

MESSAGE NUMBER (Mandatory)
This can be any number the originating station chooses. Most start with 1 the first of each year. Once a message is numbered, that same number remains with the message until delivered. Example: NR 1 Leading zeros is not recommended. Example: NR 001


PRESEDENCE (Mandatory)
R W P

E

PRECEDENCE (Mandatory) R W P E
The Precedence of the Message determines what order the messages will be handled. Most of the time all messages are handled on every net session. The following four precedences are used in ascending order of priority:


ROUTINE (R on CW) 99.99% of all messages have this precedence. These messages will be handled last.


WELFARE (W on CW) This message is either an inquiry to the health and welfare of an individual in a disaster area or a report of the health and welfare of an individual. These messages will be handled before ROUTINE traffic.


PRIORITY (P on CW) These are messages have specific time limits. They are also for Official messages, not covered in the EMERGENCY category. This traffic will be handled before WELFARE or ROUTINE.


EMERGENCY (EMERGENCY on CW) Any message having life and death urgency to any person or group of persons, which is transmitted by Amateur Radio in the absence of regular communication facilities. When in doubt, do NOT use this precedence. This traffic will be handle first and immediately.
Example: NR 1 R (for Routine)

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HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS (Optional)
A B C D E F G

Handling Instructions are sometimes used to tell the various stations along the way, what the desires of the originating station are. If not needed, it is best not to use. On phone: the sending station would say, "HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS (*)", n explained below. On CW: Send HX(*).


HX A (Followed by a number) Collect land line delivery authorized by the by addressee within ... miles. (If no number, authorization is unlimited).


HX B (Followed by a number) Cancel message if not delivered within ... hours of filing time and service originating station.


HX C Report the time and date of delivery to originating station.


HX D Report to the originating station the identity of the station from which you received, plus time and date. Report the identity of the station to which it was relayed, plus time and date, or if delivered report time and date of delivery.


HX E Delivering station gets a reply from the addressee, and originates a message back.


HX F (Followed by number) Hold delivery until ... (date).


HX G Delivery by mail or land line toll call not required. If toll or other expense involved, cancel message and service originating station.


Example: NR 1 R HXG

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STATION OF ORIGIN (Mandatory)
This is the call sign of the Amateur Radio Station generating (originating) this message. This call sign, along with the message number, serve as the "serial number" of this message. Any future reference to this message would be: "Number nn of CALL nn4nnn".
Example: NR 1 R WA2VUV


CHECK (Mandatory)
This is a count of the number of words used in the TEXT (only) of the message. Words in the address or signature are NOT counted. Groups of figures, letters, combinations of figures and letters, and "X" are counted as words. This is the method that Amateurs use to make sure that the TEXT was received without error. Both the sender and receiver should end up with the same word count (CHECK).
Example: NR 1 R WA2VUV 12


PLACE OF ORIGIN (Mandatory)
This field is the City and State of either the Station of Origin or the person in the Signature. In most cases, this will be the same place.
Example: NR 1 R WA2VUV 12 BOSTON MA

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TIME FILED (Optional)
The time the message was originated. You may either use UTC or your Local time. Examples: 1615Z or 1115 EST. Most messages do NOT use this field. It is only useful if the message has a short time value.
Example: NR 1 R WA2VUV 12 BOSTON MA 1615Z


DATE (Mandatory)
This is the date the message was originated. In Amateur Radio, we use month and day. The year is NOT used. If the message is over a year old, it should be sent to the circular file. Do not use the number corresponding to the month. Do not say 12-20,
Please use wording of December, two, zero
Example: NR 1 R WA2VUV 12 BOSTON MA 1615Z DEC 20


ADDRESSEE (Mandatory)
The name(s) and address of the person to which this message is going. It looks like the address on an envelope used in snail mail. Include a phone number, it is really important for a speedy delivery. The more information here, the easier the delivery will be.
Example:
GEORGE R HAMILTON
1234 BRUSHY CREEK DRIVE
BANDERA TX 99877

As phone figures:919 555 1234

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DELIVERING STATION INFO (Optional)
This section is rarely used. If the message is to be mailed or hand delivered, it is nice to put your (the delivering station) info here so the addressee can reach you if there is any question, or they want to send a return message. Most messages are delivered by phone.


TEXT (Mandatory)
Finally! This is the message you are sending for the signature person to the addressee. It should be short (usually less than 25 words) and in telegram style. No punctuation is used. The letter "X" is used (similar to STOP in telegrams) to end one idea and start another. Many messages do not even have an "X" in them. Example TEXT:
ARRIVE 7PM DEC 24 X
LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING YOU
X LOVE
The above TEXT has a count of 12. So the CHECK is 12. As Amateur Radio is non-commercial, the TEXT should have no commercial value. Each Radio Amateur is the judge of what is commercial and what is not.


SIGNATURE (Mandatory)
This is the name if the person sending the message. It may be the name or call of the originating station. However, it is usually the name of a "third party", for whom the originating station is generating the message.


AMATUER STATION (Optional)
Used for identifying an amateur radio station along with their signature. It doesn't have to be the originating station of the message.

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Delivery Date and Time (Optional) (not found on original radiogram I modified the original for my needs.) This I use for keeping record of when I delivered the radiogram



Additional Comments (Optional)
(not found on original radiogram I modified the original for my needs.) This I use for op. notes and if I left message with an alternate person other than the addressee strictly for my notes..

RECEIVED (Optional)
This is for the handling station to write down whom they received the message from. This field is only for the book keeping of the handling station.

SENT (Optional)
This is for the handling station to write down whom they sent the message to. This field is only for the book keeping of the handling station.

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Verbally passing traffic on a net.


When net control gives permission for you to pass your traffic to another station, the receiving station of your message contacts you and says “ready to copy”.

Your message would go like this, just read it exactly like this and fill in the blanks with your info. Remember when reading the message that someone is writing it on the other end, so read at writing speed.

“Please copy my number: 1, Routine, HX Golf, (your call sign), 25, (your location), (time if applicable),December two zero.
Going to (your addressee) and (amateur call sign if any), figures 1234 Brushy Creek Drive, Bandera TX, zip figures 99877, phone figures 919 555 1234, break for text.”

When they say, “go with text,” read your message word for word at writing speed, any tough words use phonetics. The number of words should match the (check) in the preamble. ARL Message codes are always phonetically spelled out. One number character per box. Ex. ARL Fifty Six would be 3 words. When done delivering your text to receiving station say, “Break for Signature”.

Give signature of message sender, amateur call sign if applicable and say “end message number one, how copy”.

The receiving station will acknowledge your message number one and say “thanks for the traffic” ending with their call sign.

You can reply by saying “thank you for taking it” and end with your call sign so net control knows the message has been passed and you both are finished.

That’s all there is to passing a message. Pretty easy isn't it. Not much to it, this is how we do it on the DFW traffic net, some nets are different, you just have to listen to see what their format is like.

Delivering a radiogram is even easier. Call the person with phone number provided, read the text part of the message, explain ARL message codes if there are any and they don’t know what they mean, and tell them who it is from. That’s it.

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BACK TO DFW MAIN PAGE I know how to send one NOW.

last updated: 13 May 2008

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